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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
aid to pakistan, about one-third of its annual total. this according to administration officials. relations between the two nations have been strained, especially since that u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden only a short distance, i should say, from pakistan's leading military academy. the might of those trying to survive in the horn of africa is far outstripping the ability of anyone to help. the u.n.'s chief refugee official said today the crisis in somalia alone is the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. to give an idea of the scale he was visiting a refugee camp the size of cleveland. tony guidea has more. >> reporter: look into this child's eyes, he knows something you and i will never know how it feels to be desperately hungry. there are many children like him in this hospital in mogadishu, mall nourished children, some close to death, all refugees from the drought and violence destroying somalia. >> if you are a hungry person, somebody once told me, it feels as if there is bleach in your belly, it hurts so much. >> reporter: bettina speaks for the world food prog
were traveling to pakistan, then they came back to the uk. the worry is that america has similar challenges and parallels. >> and apparently according to some reports i saw today, that's exactly what osama bin laden was hoping for, targeting specifically somalia and members of al shabaab to do just that, attack the u.s. according to u.s. officials, al qaeda is on the brink of collapse. if that happens, what other groups, what other factions would be ready to step in and fill the void? is that even what would happen? >> transnational terrorism has diversified. it's no longer about one group. bin laden's ideology has po live rated since 9/11. there are outfits who have their own resources, leadership, cell strauk chur, design and commitment to plot and commitment transnational attacks. one leading element has been the al qaeda franchise in yemen that has tried to target the united states over the last few year, especially going after the aviation industry. al shabaab which is next door in somalia is another group that's concerning. and the worry is that at some point al shabaab may
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)